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Connecting LED lights of different colors and voltages?

Discussion in 'Electrics Outside of the UK' started by ivanzuelox, 6 Apr 2016.

  1. ivanzuelox

    ivanzuelox

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    Hi guys, I want to assemble a panel of lights of different colors for the lighting of my living room

    The only thing I know of electricity is that: there are different cables for different resistors for different
    voltages according to use.

    I have the idea of order of LED lights in a square aluminum board, but more than that I do not know. Also I
    want to connect the maximum number of LED lights possible without overloading the three drivers.

    I currently have 3 types of LED lights: white, red and blue. The technical detail of these is as follows:

    List of my leds with electrical technical details:
    - 50 (quantity) x 3w (watts) cold white / 3.23.8v 700ma
    - 50 x 3w red / 2.22.4v 750ma
    - 50 x 3w blue 445455nm / 3.63.8v 700ma

    Also I have:
    - 150 x pcb stars of aluminum
    - 3 x 50 watts drivers INPUT AC: 85/265v50/60hz AC: 0.8A OUTPUT DC: 24-38V DC: 1.5a+5%
    10C*5&*1W

    Pic sketch attached

    I hope someone will agree to help me.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: 6 Apr 2016
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  3. ivanzuelox

    ivanzuelox

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    I forgot the voltage of my country: is 220 v at 50 hz, C and L plug

    The DC 24-38 v
    The driver aren't manually changeable
     
    Last edited: 6 Apr 2016
  4. endecotp

    endecotp

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    Why did you get those particular drivers?
    Do the LEDs have wires, or do you need to solder them?
    What are "pcb stars of aluminium"?

    (Maybe post photos of the components?)
     
  5. ivanzuelox

    ivanzuelox

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    Thanks for your answer @endecotp:
    A picture says more than a thousand words:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    The best way to power a large number of LED elements that all have the same current requirement is to connect them in series and suppley the series string from a constant current source. To ensure failure of one LED element does not blank the whole string each LED element should have a Zener diode connected across it. The zener will not conduct current if the LED element is conductng but will conduct if the LED element goes open circuit.


    50 white LED elements at 3.6 volts per element would require 180 volts at the output of the constant current source irrespecting of the current it was supplying to the string of LED elements

    A lower voltage would be safer

    10 white LED elements at 3.6 volts per element would require 36 volts.

    The constant current through the string can be provided by using a 40 volt supply and a resistor in series with the string. The LED element take 36 volts leaving 4 volts across the resistor. For a current of 700mA the resistor would have to be 5.7 Ω and 3 watt.

    More accurate calculation and possible adjustment of the voltage to fine tune the current would be needed.
     
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  7. endecotp

    endecotp

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    Can you solder?
     
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  9. ivanzuelox

    ivanzuelox

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    Yes, I have the experience. Little experience, but I have.
     
  10. endecotp

    endecotp

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    Start by soldering the LEDs onto the "stars".
    Then fix the stars onto your panel.

    Now we have to think about the power supplies. Why did you get those ones? They have a 1.5A constant-current output, but your LEDs want only 700 mA. The easiest thing to do would be to get power supplies rated 700 mA. If that's not practical it may be possible to wire the LED chains in parallel, but there are some subtleties to doing that.
     
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  11. ivanzuelox

    ivanzuelox

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    Thanks for your answer @endecotp, I buy these drivers only for his 50w, I have no experience on voltages, milliamps, etc.
     
    Last edited: 8 Apr 2016
  12. endecotp

    endecotp

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    See if you can find any that are better suited to the LEDs you have.
    To be honest, I think that properly soldering the LEDs onto the bases, so that they are in good thermal contact, will be a big challenge for you if you don't have surface-mount soldering skills....
     
  13. ivanzuelox

    ivanzuelox

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    I think weld the stars to an aluminum plate of 18x20 centimeters with 4 millimeters thick, it would be better a higher thicker?
     
  14. endecotp

    endecotp

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    Weld aluminium? Not something I've ever done. It might work. Personally I'd glue them.

    Check if the base of the star is connected electrically to either the + or - terminal. It probably isnn't, but if it is, the bases need to be insulated from the panel.
     
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