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Crimps or alternate way of joining power lead inside appliance

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by kez1, 5 Aug 2019.

  1. kez1

    kez1

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    I am replacing kinked iron cable.
    Crimps joining power lead inside iron look like this.

    Anyone suggest where to get these or alternative?
    IMG_20190805_135311.jpg
     
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  3. rsgaz

    rsgaz

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  4. winston1

    winston1

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    Solder the wires.
     
  5. RF Lighting

    RF Lighting

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    Yeah solder inside something that gets really hot seems like a great idea. I wonder why the manufacturers who know how to design their products didn’t do that.
     
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  6. conny

    conny

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    :LOL::LOL::LOL:
     
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  7. winston1

    winston1

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    Well stop wondering and learn about mass production techniques and cost saving.

    Consider that tungsten light bulbs have their connections soldered to the base contacts.

    Irons run at a temperature below the melting point of solder.
     
  8. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    That depends on the solder - but, in terms of the solder most likely to be used for electrical work (snippets from Wikipedia) ...
    ... and ...
    Kind REgards, John
     
  9. DetlefSchmitz

    DetlefSchmitz

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    I think you'll find they don't use lead any more!
     
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  11. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    They don't, but I think you'll find that the common lead-free has about the same melting point as 60/40 Sn/Pb - which was the first quote I came across in haste. However, if we're being fussy, I'll look it up ........
    ... so, a bit higher that 60/40 Sn/Pb, but still 'uncomfortable' in the context of an iron!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  12. echoes

    echoes

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    My soldering iron element has soldered connections. Just saying.
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Indeed, the same as some of mine - I think all the small Antex ones (as with the ancient Henley ones etc.), and probably many others, have soldered connections to the element. However, I do not know (and somewhat doubt) whether it is 'ordinary' (as opposed to high-melting-point) solder.

    Those connections to the element obviously should not, in normal service, get to anything like the operating temp of the iron's tip - but I would still have thought that it would be somewhat 'too close for comfort' (temp-wise) with 'ordinary solder'.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  14. winston1

    winston1

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    Ah yes. I have replaced several such elements, Adcola and Antex, in my working life and ordinary 60/40 solder was used with no problems.
     
  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    So have I, and I too have used 60/40 (since that's all I would have had), again with 'no problems'. However, I do wonder whether that is what will have been used for the original 'factory soldering'.

    I clearly must have laid in some very generous stocks of 60/40 solder many years ago, since that's what I am still using for electronics work!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  16. winston1

    winston1

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    I believe it probably was as I never had any problems desoldering the original element with (another) ordinary iron.
     
  17. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Same here. However, although I've had umpteen soldering irons (and still have many of them), none have been 'fancy' ones. In other words, I've never had a soldering iron with any sort of temperature control - and if one leaves such irons on for a while, the tip often gets far hotter than is needed to melt 60/40 solder.

    Kind Regards, John
     
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