DIY chandelier junction box advice

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My wife has decided we need a Kilner jar chandelier in our kitchen, something along the lines of this:
il_340x270.1144059916_1ldu.jpg


However, as we're looking at close to £1000 for a specialist company to put together an old cartwheel, eight earthed and hooked lampholders, a bit of chain, some old jam jars and some heat resistant flex which all in can be bought for around £50, I figured I should have a go at wiring the lampholders (like these) in parallel myself and get our electrician to test it before fitting it.
antique-brass-hooked-bc-lampholder-55-p.jpg


Trouble is the electrician says he's never seen anything like it (the chandelier) and wouldn't know where to begin wiring it up. In particular he wasn't sure how to get the eight cables, one from each lampholder, to join up in the wheel hub and go into the single cable which comes down from the ceiling.

So I would appreciate any link or advice on what sort of terminal block/choc block/junction box I would need to take a three core cable from the ceiling and distribute it to the eight lampholders, whilst meeting current UK lighting regs? And if I do wire it up, do any tests need to be done on it before the electrician can connect it up to the mains coming out the ceiling rose?

I am assuming that whatever the mass-produced chandelier below (as an example) has inside it would be what we would need, since it's operating on exactly the same principle, viz a single cable comes down from the ceiling rose into the body of the lamp, and is distributed in parallel to eight bulbs:
SL-2268-8GY.jpg


Or do I have to explain to my wife that we need to choose a different kind of light, or pay a grand to get someone else to make it for us?

Regarding the Kilners, I am aware of the need to drill ventilation holes in the tops, but as I only plan to use 4W LED bulbs they will be producing a negligible amount of heat regardless.
 
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Multiple wires within light fittings are typically connected with closed end crimps, such as these: http://www.lampspares.co.uk/closed-end-plastic-crimp-connector-medium-nes25-plu66066

Exactly how it's been done in the wheel example or where they have concealed the wires and joints is unknown.

an old cartwheel, eight earthed and hooked lampholders, a bit of chain, some old jam jars and some heat resistant flex which all in can be bought for around £50,
Even though you are evidently disappointed that the manufactured piece is a lot of money, there is absolutely no way anyone could obtain the parts for such a thing for only £50.
They won't use old bits either, it will all be new stuff.

It's entirely possible to make such things yourself, but it will involve far more time, cost and knowledge that you think it does.
 
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Electrically its fairly straightforward, there will be a join box in the centre where all the tails to the individual lights connect to a single supply cable. You can use a single 1g 25mm box and a blank plate as your join box.

DS
 
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Well, I wasn't including the cost of the terminal blocks as I don't know what to order hence the question... Eight lampholders at £3.50 each = £28, eight Mason jars for £16, a couple of metres of flex, upcycle an old wooden wheel - perhaps starting at a tenner. My point was not, what's the absolute least amount I can do this for, but that I have time on my hands and don't want to spend a fortune on something for which the raw materials are inexpensive if I can make it myself and have it pass electrical regulations! If butt crimps are used in light fittings and I can buy and fit them myself then is there any reason not to?
 
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I would use several small junction boxes. One above each lamp on the top of the wheel rim. Then each box has only 3 cables, one from the previous lamp, one to the lamp below and one to the next lamp. At one end the there is no previous lamp hence one cable is the cable from the ceiling rose bringing power to that box. The cable to the last lamp can go along the rim to the box above the previous lamp.
 
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4w is only negligible if your enclosure can dissipate that much without heating up inside too much!
You could wire them up as a ring round the edge and spurs to each lamp. Although you needn't close the ring at the end. Then you only need 3 cores into each junction. Or do without the spurs and chain inside the lamp holder.
 
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The ones you see in pubs tend to have small round J/Bs situated on the top of the wheel,using black or gold flex, an alternative to heat flex is to oversleeve in the holders with high temp sleeving you should not use normal jam jar lids, without adapting, the ones you see on sale have vent holes to let the heat out and usually thick glass, even with led lamps the temperature gets quite high and can eventually destroy the lamp.
A more common look now is multiple flexes, and the holder and long flex usually come pre made, so a diyer can just use clips or hooks to hang the wires.
There sold most places with a choice of flex colour.

https://www.lampsandlights.co.uk/mo...MI_L6h5fCT1QIVqbvtCh3CLwzyEAYYBiABEgLdgfD_BwE


big_ceiling-plate-large-nine-cordgrip-plastic-antique-flex-group.jpg



big_kits-ceiling-pendant-multi-ceiling-plate-cordgrip-metal-antique-bulb-globe-medium-es-led-filament.jpg
 
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