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Double roman tiles on low pitch roof.

Discussion in 'Building' started by xdrive, 29 Dec 2020.

  1. xdrive

    xdrive

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    Hi. I have a 15 degree pitched roof on extension.

    On my main roof I have sandtoft double roman tiles.
    I want to use matching tiles on extension.

    The minimum headlap for tiles on a 17.5 degree pitch is 100mm. For a 22.5 degree it's 75mm.

    Technical spec says 120mm maximum headlap but doesn't mention pitch so I'm assuming minimum pitch for the sandtoft double roman are 17.5 degrees

    Would the tiles be OK on a 15 degree pitch with a 120mm headlap? Don't get much driving rain around back.

    I was going to use Redland regent tiles as they go down to 12.5 degrees however they are like rocking horse poo.

    I don't want to plyboard, felt and cross batten as it thickens the roof which doesn't look too clever.

    Cheers
     
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  3. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Tiles won't be approved below their stated 17.5° pitch, no matter what head lap.

    You can board and counter batten, and design the eaves and verge to appear as a standard roof and not be visibly thicker. It will be slightly higher with potentially greater distance from frame heads to soffit, but won't appear thicker.
     
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