Fused spur - distance to draining board

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Hi all,

Had a new sink fitted, kept the tap in the same place but now have the draining board on the right hand side.

The socket and fused switch are horizontally less than 30cm from edge of draining board. I assume it's now against regulations? If so, can the fused switch comply with regulations by being mounted 25cm to the right of draining board edge and up the wall near the ceiling? Is there a minimum height in this scenario or does only the 30cm horizontal rule apply?

Alternatively, can the fused switch be mounted under the worktop, on the wall at the back of the open cupboard and still comply with regulations?

PXL_20211219_170656136.jpg
 
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Hi,

I believe there are no regs for the distance, and the 30cm minimum is 'advisory'
Though it would probably be best to stick to the advisory distance, if you were letting the house.

Edit: the advisory comes from building regs, general guidance - and what do they know about electrickery! ;)
 
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Had a new sink fitted, kept the tap in the same place but now have the draining board on the right hand side.
The socket and fused switch are horizontally less than 30cm from edge of draining board. I assume it's now against regulations?
Nope. No mention of such a distance from sinks in the regulations and certainly no mention of draining boards.
The FCU is more than 30cm. from the sink anyway.

If so, can the fused switch comply with regulations by being mounted 25cm to the right of draining board edge and up the wall near the ceiling? Is there a minimum height in this scenario or does only the 30cm horizontal rule apply?
It's fine as it is.
 
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There is no such regulation and even if there were the regs are not statutory.

What is the FCU for? If it is for that washing machine you don’t need it as the WM plug will have a fuse.
 
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There is no such regulation and even if there were the regs are not statutory.

What is the FCU for? If it is for that washing machine you don’t need it as the WM plug will have a fuse.
to$$er...
 
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There is no such regulation and even if there were the regs are not statutory.

What is the FCU for? If it is for that washing machine you don’t need it as the WM plug will have a fuse.

There's no problem having an FCU though, is there?

For all we know, there could be another socket spurred off the washing machine socket.

Or a flex outlet has been used for the washing machine.

It's not a problem at all how it is, so why even mention it?
 
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What is the FCU for? If it is for that washing machine you don’t need it as the WM plug will have a fuse.

It's for a single socket behind the built-in fridge (to the right). I guess the same applies since the fridge also has a plug. Would you have fitted a non-fused double-pole switch instead?
 
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Buy some plug covers (like the kiddy ones) to blank the plugs if not in use.

Might be an idea.
 
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Buy some plug covers (like the kiddy ones) to blank the plugs if not in use.

Might be an idea.
Oh dear, don't start on socket covers! :LOL:
Probably the worst idea ever!
Applying a cheap flimsy bit of plastic as a 'safety measure' to our beautifully designed and safe electrical sockets - which ones confirm to British Standards?
Some interesting views here ;) :
http://www.fatallyflawed.org.uk/
 
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Oh dear, don't start on socket covers! :LOL:
Probably the worst idea ever!
Applying a cheap flimsy bit of plastic as a 'safety measure' to our beautifully designed and safe electrical sockets - which ones confirm to British Standards?
Some interesting views here ;) :
http://www.fatallyflawed.org.uk/

Well that is an interesting read!

However, the issue seems to be that by fitting them, they are assumed to make the plug safe for children but in reality, its the opposite as children can use them to gain access to the live terminal.

That's me educated!

However, i still think they have a use here?
This is for protection against ingress, not children which i would think is fine.

However, as the article says, fit and finish is important.

Good link.
 
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I love demonstrating the dangers of them to the people who insist on their presence.

First I poke my neon/led into the L&N holes which of course doesn't get anywhere near the live parts, then I put the plug in but upside down and make sure it's right in and do the same test with the screwdriver which lights up. Next I pull the cover out with a well practiced upward jerk only to find the earth pin stays in the hole where it rips off the cover.

Oops I say... then explain it's what the children do with them and finish it off with another demo with screwdriver
 

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