Neutral for wifi switch

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by sgreenwood1, 6 Dec 2021.

  1. sgreenwood1

    sgreenwood1

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    Hello all.

    I am wishing to install a 'smart' wifi light switch - see here http://tiny.cc/1c8muz - which requires a neutral wire.

    My existing circuit has several wires and I'm a little confused by it.

    I wish to install it on a spur that has been added using new wiring colour regs from an original supply using the old regs.

    The below picture shows the original switch with old wiring coming in and new wiring exiting to the to be upgraded switch through the wall where circled (switch is situated on other side of wall).

    InkedIMG_1124_LI.jpg

    The next pic shows where the wires exit into the switch I wish to make smart:

    IMG_1118.jpg

    Looking at the original wiring am I to assume there is no suitable neutral wire that I could feed into the desired socket and I need to look at alternative options?
     
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  3. terryplumb

    terryplumb

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    There are no neutrals present at those switches.
     
  4. sgreenwood1

    sgreenwood1

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    Thanks. As suspected. Appreciate your help.
     
  5. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    You may find there is both a live and a neutral, at the light/ceiling rose, that would enable the Smart Switch to be mounted there instead.
     
  6. sgreenwood1

    sgreenwood1

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    Is there a capacitor I could use to overcome this?

    The switch will control 2 wall lights and there's room behind to fit something (just) or possibly even in the switch backbox?
     
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  8. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    No, such circuit are normally designed to be very low power and low voltage, to be able to run for extended periods from a capacitor. Your kit is not and needs mains supply as input power source.
     
  9. sgreenwood1

    sgreenwood1

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  10. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    No, that is entirely different. The switch is designed to work on very low power, but with the neutral supplied in series with a normal tungsten lamp, which remain conductive when not lit. Replace the tungsten with an LED or CFL and they much higher resistance, do not pass enough current to keep the switch charged - the simple fix was to bypass the lamp with a capacitor.

    Your switch will be much more demanding in current, but no harm in trying it if you feel competent. As already said, the certain to work fix if there is L + N available at the rose, is to mount it at the rose - a surface mount box, fixed to the ceiling...
     
  11. sgreenwood1

    sgreenwood1

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    Thanks for your help.

    I'll give it further thought.

    The switch is for 2 wall lights and there's only 2 wires into the rear of each.
     
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