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Placing boiler in bathroom?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by iwilson16, 22 May 2019.

  1. iwilson16

    iwilson16

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    I have a downstairs bathroom (approx 2.5 x 2.5m), that previously had a shower, whb and wc.

    I'd like to reconfigure it to also include the boiler and washing machine (so I can move them from the open plan kitchen/diner). Is this allowed? Due to the large window on one wall, the shower would be on an inside corner, and the boiler would be in a cupboard in an adjacent corner (by the outside wall).

    I will probably install a narrow partition wall (extending approx 800mm) between the shower and the corner where the boiler would be located.

    Thanks
    Ian

    https://www.diynot.com/diy/media/rough-plan.102857/
    [​IMG]
     
  2. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Condensation on the cold metal of the washing machine from steamy showers may be detrimental to the well being of the washing machie
     
  3. jj4091

    jj4091

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    You will need an electrician to tell you if your wiring meets the regulations to allow you to have sockets & an FCU in close proximity to a shower cubicle.
     
  4. oldbutnotdead

    oldbutnotdead

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    Probably. Search for Bathroom zones electrical installations- looks as if you have enough space to do what you want to do. Unless you put a proper wall or stud partition between shower tray and the rest of the room you must have 600mm between shower tray and electrical device below 2250mm height.
    Any new cabling and sockets/FCUs will require RCD protection at the CU (to protect the cable as well as the end user).
     
  5. iwilson16

    iwilson16

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    Thanks for all the replies.

    I should add that this is *not* the main bathroom of the flat. That’s on the floor above where the bedrooms are. The shower in here will be rarely used ... probably just the odd occasion when I have a guest staying. It will mostly be used for a downstairs wc. I’d also be getting a decent extraction to the outside fitted.

    I wouldn’t be doing the work myself (apart from the strip-out), but will get professionals in, including the qualified spark.

    Ian
     
  6. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    In any event, any circuit 'supplying a bathroom' has to be RCD protected. Whilst that requirement is (as usual) 'not retrospective', I suspect that many would say that adding things to an existing circuit would be enough to invoke that requirement for 'the circuit'.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  7. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    ... IF it is a conventional flue boiler - which, in this day and age, is probably fairly unlikely.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  8. oldbutnotdead

    oldbutnotdead

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    That was my thought also
     
  9. oldbutnotdead

    oldbutnotdead

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    OP, can you confirm that the boiler you're planning to put in there is room-sealed (ie draws its air supply from outside). If it is and is installed to mfr spec then there will be no additional CO hazard
     
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  10. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Of course boiler airflow and combustion are not affected if it's a 'balanced flue' boiler (which most are these days). I'm sure that the HSE know that, even if you don't.

    However, you presumably noticed that there was an "IF" at the start of my comment - IF, by any chance, the OP is planning to have a conventional flue boiler fitted then your comments about ventilation and fans would be valid.
     
  11. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Common these days, are they, open flue gas boilers?
     
  12. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    You're the one who gave the OP a warning which very probably wasn't relevant to the type of boiler he will be having installed. Did it not occur to you, before worrying him, to first ask him whether, by any chance, he was planning to install what is now a fairly uncommon type of boiler?
     
  13. donrkebab

    donrkebab

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    So the bottom line is, I warn someone about a real possible danger that can be fatal, and get criticised.

    And you all tell me and the poster that I am wrong. In the knowledge that none of you know anything about the existing installation, but you're prepared to risk killing people based on your ridiculous arrogant assumptions.
     
  14. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Indeed. You get criticised for worrying the OP about something which may well not be (probably is not) relevant to him.

    Under certain circumstances, the "real possible danger" could exist - but you should first have ascertained whether those circumstances do exist for the OP (and the chances are that they don't) and, if they do, then issue what would then be a valid warning.
     
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  15. iwilson16

    iwilson16

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    I would be getting a new condensing boiler fitted, rather than try and move the current boiler. Probably a Worcester Bosch or Viessman.

    Electrics to this bathroom (for washing machine socket) would be a new circuit run from the CU (I had a full rewire done when I moved in 4 years ago, so CU is fairly new).

    Only work I’ll be doing is ensuring access to under the floor for pipes and wires. (With some separation between them, of course). It’s an old Edinburgh Victorian flat, so not always easy to find space.

    I plan to have my trusted heating Engineer also project manage the bathroom fit-out and fit the new boiler. (He does both regularly).

    Thanks,
    Ian
     
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