Plastic bit on pull cord switches is for insulation/saftey reasons?

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Just started watching the following video, where it is claimed that the plastic bit in the string of pull cord switches is for insulation purposes and thus is a safety device.

I can understand this if true, although is new news to me. Any truth to this, have you heard this before, and is there a specific regulation in BS7671 what covers this in relation to pull cords?

Video (6:08 into video):


Regards: Elliott.
 
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Just started watching the following video, where it is claimed that the plastic bit in the string of pull cord switches is for insulation purposes and thus is a safety device. I can understand this if true, although is new news to me. Any truth to this, have you heard this before, and is there a specific regulation in BS7671 what covers this in relation to pull cords?
Utter nonsense I would say!

Kind Regards, John
 
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Deffo an electrical insulator.

Loads of steam makes the string wet and gets into the switch.

They didn't used to be fitted and shock reports used to occur.

Totally pukka.
 
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I’ve stopped watching this guys videos. He gets me too wound up. He presents himself as the best and most knowledgeable sparks in the world, yet does average quality installs, and gets things wrong time and time again.
 
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I’ve stopped watching this guys videos. He gets me too wound up. He presents himself as the best and most knowledgeable sparks in the world, yet does average quality installs, and gets things wrong time and time again.
I couldn't agree more.
And the same is true for the others.

It just highlights how the regs are not accurate enough to be instructions.
 
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A recent one I watched. “The gas doesn’t need bonding as it’s a plastic incommer” (sleeved steel pipe) and no mention of the old abandoned gas main which is still an extraneous conductive part.

72818314-F0E3-4E72-B90E-719DD24E0317.jpeg
 
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A recent one I watched. “The gas doesn’t need bonding as it’s a plastic incommer” (sleeved steel pipe)

View attachment 201533
Nice.

That reminds me:
In 2 of my flats the annual gas check lists earth bond as 'missing or incorrectly fitted'. with both the bond is after the first tee...

Because the same fitter installed a new tee so close to the meter there is no space for it before.

But of course the good tenants read their copy and panic. I have sent reports and pics to gas safe but it made no difference.
 
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The video was still playing at the ceiling rose bit.

I've not come across those, how common are/were they?
 
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Nice.

That reminds me:
In 2 of my flats the annual gas check lists earth bond as 'missing or incorrectly fitted'. with both the bond is after the first tee...

Because the same fitter installed a new tee so close to the meter there is no space for it before.

But of course the good tenants read their copy and panic. I have sent reports and pics to gas safe but it made no difference.


I’ve just reread the regulation, and it’s a strange one.

E879AA63-A73B-4C9F-A00E-8847B8C7D432.jpeg


It seems to be saying that the 600mm rule should be applied where possible but common sense may be applied if site conditions dictate, but the connection must be before the tee with no exceptions.

I have also seen gas meters where a tee is soldered directly to the meter union. For me a connection just past the tee but still at the meter is no problem at all. Maybe this is where the regs prove they can not possibly cover every single real world scenario.
 
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I’ve just reread the regulation, and it’s a strange one.

View attachment 201535

It seems to be saying that the 600mm rule should be applied where possible but common sense may be applied if site conditions dictate, but the connection must be before the tee with no exceptions.

I have also seen gas meters where a tee is soldered directly to the meter union. For me a connection just past the tee but still at the meter is no problem at all. Maybe this is where the regs prove they can not possibly cover every single real world scenario.
Yes that's the situation, one has the tee directly on the union and the other has an elbow directly on the union and the tee.

My agent doesn't understand so it's me gets to explain to the tenants.

I have even photocopied and laminated the reg with a photo of the fitting for both properties and anotated which is part of the 'flat pack' left in the flat for the tenant.
 
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Deffo an electrical insulator. Loads of steam makes the string wet and gets into the switch. They didn't used to be fitted and shock reports used to occur. Totally pukka.
Are you serious? :)

If the switch were made properly, the 'pull cord' could be bare metal wire without presenting a safety hazard!

Kind Regards, John
 
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Are you serious? :)

If the switch were made properly, the 'pull cord' could be bare metal wire without presenting a safety hazard!

Kind Regards, John
I've been aware of the reason ever since they changed from the internal brass screw fitting and the insulator was introduced some 40 or 50 years ago. Actually I recall that pull switches used to be a chain that forever broke and needed replacing before the string took over and at the time it was a smooth natural fibre like cotton which was equally vulnerable to breakage.

The sad thing is bathroom companies charge a lot of money for chrome or brass versions.
 

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