Use for flooring chipboard off cuts?

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I laid a new floor using 22mm T&G chipboard.

I’m a mediocre DIYer so have plenty of off cuts from errors.

Is there any use for these or should I just take them all to the tip?

I hate waste but they’re taking up needed space and with either the tongue or groove missing and the unattractive appearance I’m not aware of any use for them now the flooring is complete.

Cheers
 
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I made some shelf's in the garage with offcuts I had.

If you've only got small offcuts then either give away for free or skip them
 

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I've reused so much stuff so far (4 years into renovation). It's amazing how random bits of wood, discarded ages ago, suddenly fit perfectly in a new job.
 
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I put a lot of scrap timber on Freecycle, somebody collected it for his multifuel stove.

I think they are fairly clean-burning.
 
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i would suggest anything less than 150mm x600mm wide pretty well discarded
odds and sods can be kept in storage boxes but discard if not used by a year to 18 months
 
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there was a time when you could have a pot-bellied stove in the corner of the workshop.
 
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there was a time when you could have a pot-bellied stove in the corner of the workshop.
Yes, but in those days we were burning softwood or hardwood offcuts and even old wooden plane bodies. Very handy for keeping hide glue ready and boiling a kettle (or heating your pasties), too.

Burning chipboard isn’t a good idea
I agree - it leaves a lot of sooty oily residue on the flue which can catch fire, but also the resins used in the manufacture can generate some pretty toxic chemicals when burned in a grate. Industrial high temperature boilers with O2 sensors and gas "afterburners" (such as the Talbot series) can deal with chipboard safely, but they aren't exactly a standard grate

Here's advice on what not to burn in a stove from a supplier in my own part of the world
 
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yes i agree i will only ever burn say 2 or 3 bits totalling a square foot in any one day
 

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