Using a MK Grid switch, inc dimmers INSIDE bathroom wall

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by cabinman, 9 Jul 2009.

  1. cabinman

    cabinman

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    Hi,

    Our bathroom is being re-decorated and as part of this, the lighting changing - the controls for this are due to be an MK Grid switch 4 gang - to operate the lighting in various locations of the room (ceiling, alcoves, bathroom mirror etc...)

    Now, looking over the regulatations, the 17th suggests Zone 0, 1 and 2 - the old 'Zone 3' done away with

    information I found for Zone 3:

    "Zone 3 is the rest of the bathroom area outside the other zones and in areas where no flowing water is to be. There are No IP requirements in this area. "

    My question - from the above information and since measuring it out, there is a nice rectangle of space inside the bathroom, that is not classed as any zone - therefore, I understand I can have the switch INSIDE the bathroom

    there is zero chance of water splash in this location, there is zero chance of being in the shower tray and touching the light switch - its is too far to reach

    I have tried to mock up a diagram of the wall it is on and the zone 17th edition that I think I grasp


    Is this safe? I see no reason why the plastic fitting cannot exist INSIDE the bathroom??? Thanks for any advice and comments on this matter :)

    (will post pic in a reply)
     
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  3. cabinman

    cabinman

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    picture here:

    [​IMG]


    Bathroom is 3m by 2.4 (rectangle)

    EDIT: crude birds eye view:

    [​IMG]

    followed info from here: http://diydata.com/electrics/bathroom_electrics/bathroom_electrics.php

    opposite wall to this will have the Sink and Toilet - again, I have measure back from this and have found a neat rectangle of space, that is in no zone from both water sources

    actual shower head is on same wall as sink and toilet, so no where near switching

    hope this is enough detail lol..... last minute realisation, before the tilers turn up

    17th also says RCD protection for all circuits in the bathroom, this will be done :)
     
  4. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Condensation does not respect the zone boundaries.

    So even if it is "legal" to fit the switch can you be 100% certain that it will be safe if wet from condensation ?.

    If you really must have the switches inside the bathroom then consider using air bellow operated switches such as Herga The accessible switches are non electrical and therefore safe. The actual switches are in a dry place outside the bathroom

     
  5. flameport

    flameport

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    The switch is more than 60cm from the bath/shower, therefore it can be fitted there.

    There are no zones around sinks or toilets.
     
  6. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    Does not solve the dimmer requirement.
     
  7. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    There is a dimmer that operates from a contact closure, As long as the contact is closed for it cycles from dim to bright and back to dim. If I remember a short closure toggles it on or off without affecting the brightness.
     
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  9. londonboy

    londonboy

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    How about drilling thro and fitting switch on other side of the wall?? Although I know you wana control lighting while your using the room.
     
  10. RF Lighting

    RF Lighting

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    Use a remote controlled dimmer mounted on the ceiling
     
  11. oharaf

    oharaf

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    That was going to be my suggestion Rob
     
  12. securespark

    securespark

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    Or pull-cord dimmer?
     
  13. cabinman

    cabinman

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    Thank you for the information, this makes me feel more confident about the placement. They will be further 'sheiled' by the wall mounted cupboards too.


    Thanks for your insight, I will try and look around for something similar - we have Neutral at the switch area, so something might work out. Would prefer a similar look to 'traditional' switches however.



    Main reason for keeping the switches inside the room, is to keep the wall outside the bathroom and the landing space free of extra swtiches - keeping a clean wall for the pending wallpaper. A four gang outside the door, almost at the top of the stairs is going to look horrible.

    The wall, being internal block, is 'thin' - would have trouble fixing on the other side now the switch back box has been chased out - that would be the backup plan, in case of extreme comments against keeping it inside :)


    Sounds interesting, but is this like a small 'tv' remote - very likely to be lost and a bit fiddly to use ? or did I mis-understand. We have four outputs to switch. The concern mentioned before by a user was condensation, if heat rises etc... then will this not be even worse, being on the ceiling?


    Thanks for your suggestion. We have four outputs to switch - having four pull cords is going to be 'silly' :) it is of course another option


    Thank you all very much for your replies. Not ignoring any advice, but looking at it, it does sound 'safe' enough for general use.

    1) outside any zone and far enough from any water source
    2) plastic construction faceplate/switches - no chance of live upon touch
    3) RCD protection on lighting circuit and shower pump, as per 17th

    although Grid Dimmers are being used for three of the four switches, they will generally be set at the required dimmer level and left in place - therefore only requiring a 'click' on and off - limited 'touch' time

    Thanks again for any assistance :)
     
  14. DIYnot Local

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