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Using an angle grinder safe

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by Keitai, 15 Jun 2019.

  1. Keitai

    Keitai

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    They seem like quite a dangerous tool. I was using it to cut some repair brackets on this bit of wood in picture. It did feel like it might slip and remember this guy saying you should cut with the blade going a certain way. Any tips? 20190503_174957.jpg
     
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  3. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Indeed, a dangerous but very useful machine.
    You have the work well secured which is essential and on those pieces cut from top to bottom. You need to avoid the blade digging into the work but in this situation it's unlikely.
    Always use two hands and keep the guard on.
    John :)
     
  4. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Simple hacksaw would have been suitable .
     
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  5. Notch7

    Notch7

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    Spoilsport :ROFLMAO:
     
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  6. Brigadier

    Brigadier

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    Quite so, but the OP specifically asked about safe angle grinder use.

    @Keitai

    As John said, ensure the work is secure.
    Keep both hands on the grinder.
    Don't let the blade dig in, slow and steady is the game.
    Wear decent eye and ear protection, and I prefer to wear gloves as well. Respirator, if cutting stone, brick, or the like.

    Probably though, most importantly is to plan your work properly.
    Have plenty of room to work in, and light to work by.
    Expect sparks, so don't fear them, but ensure nothing flammable is in range.
    Plan your cuts, so you can ensure that the cable isn't (and won't ever be) near the cut.
     
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  7. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    If cutting heavier material and experiencing jamming, Google 'climb milling ' and the reason may come clear (y)
    John :)
     
  8. Alway ensure you are using the correct disc for the job! Tantamount IMHO.

    Tantamount?! I meant paramount :LOL:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 16 Jun 2019
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  9. phatboy

    phatboy

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    I thought gloves were a no no? If they somehow got caught, it would be horrendous!?
     
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  11. mattylad

    mattylad

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    if you catch your skin without gloves it would be worse.
    Always wear gloves and goggles. (of course, a great many ignore that safety advise and get away with no incident).

    For the above use I would not have screwed that bracket onto the middle of the wood to cut it as your also likely to catch the wood itself, IMHO its far better to have screwed it to where the bit to cut off is hanging over the edge so that there is nothing underneath to catch the cutting disc on.
     
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  12. Munroast

    Munroast

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    I will give you a laugh - he's me cutting stone, I was showing a mate the benefits of a car radiator fan to blow the dust away. I reckon I siuit that pink hat
     
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  13. Brigadier

    Brigadier

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    Someone's nicked your car while you were busy grinding:eek::mrgreen:
     
  14. pete50

    pete50

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    An angle grinder is the most dangerous tool in the workshop, or out of it. Followed by the table saw. I only use mine when there is absolutely no alternative and I wouldn't even consider using it to cut those tiny, thin metal brackets.
     
  15. StephenStephen

    StephenStephen

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    I would remove the bracket from the wood and clamp it to cut it - I don't think an angle grinder and any kind of wood is a safe combination myself.
     
  16. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    For those tiny brackets, put the grinder away and use a hacksaw.

    In general:

    1. Never use a grinder without the side handle in place.

    2. Keep both hands on the grinder.

    3. Always make sure the work is securely clamped

    4. Don't wear gloves. If you must wear gloves, wear tight fitting ones. In no circumstances wear ordinary loose-fitting builders' gloves, as they will drag your hand onto the disc if the tool slips and they get snagged. Believe me, I've done it and you don't want to.
     
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  17. scbk

    scbk

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    Looks a nice path :cool:

    If you have much stone cutting to do a cut off saw with water is a good investment
     
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