Whatever next?

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Article in Car Mechanics magazine about timing belts / chains. I didn't know Ford developed timing belts running in oil 10 years ago. Apparently teeth fall off the belts and can get into the pump....
And BMW have engines where the timing chain is at the flywheel end so you have to remove the engine to change the chain...
Where do they think these things up?
 
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Where do they think these things up?
In the special department for ensuring that cars are economically unrepairable after 5 years, compelling people to buy a new one.

The same people thought up the scrappage trade in 'discount' scam where perfectly good older cars are disposed of so car manufacturers can sell more new ones.
 
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The days of DIY servicing are over. I haven't even found the oil filter on my present car after 6 months. I suspect it might be visible if I pulled off the undertray. It's got an electronic oil level indicator and I wish it had a manual one I could check to reassure myself. I'd like to return to the early 80's with carburettors, no ECUs and timing belts as easy to change as on a Ford Pinto engine.
 
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Not on the current Volvo V70 it appears. In 4000 miles the gauge still reads "7/8 full , OK" and I wonder about it's accuracy. Last 2 French diesels had a stick and a gauge. And they call it progress. Next new car I buy I'll be asking if it has a dipstick and the young salesman will probably say "what?"
 
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I bought that copy while I was away last week and was surprised to read that. The only previous experience I have had of making dry things oily was the clutch on my Vespa scooter.

Peter
 
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I wonder how accurate these electronic gauges are.....my Berlingo indicates a low level even when it is perfect by the dipstick :eek: Maybe it isn't critical but I do like to get it right. On some VAG motors I can suck out an extra 1/2 litre from the oil cooler if I have a mind to - so if I add the recommended 4.5 litres its still a little low.
John :)
 
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Salesman ( bit of an ar*ehole) told me there was no need to open the bonnet until a warning light or message came up. That's no good to an old fogey like me. Does anyone know how an electronic oil sensor works?
 
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Only ever done a PSA one, and that's like a 6" dipstick......it had two holes drilled in it and measured the resistance between them, assuming there was some liquid in there. The Veedub one points upwards and is fixed into the sump.....presumably its one of the same.
John :)
 
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Some cars can tell you when the oil has been degraded by diesel following failed attempts at DPF regeneration. How does that work? Does the sump become overfull or does it know the oil has been diluted?
 
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To allow a DPF to regenerate it needs to get very hot - in one way or another. To develop heat, more fuel needs to be burned, and as a diesel car has a tank of the stuff standing by, this is what's used.....although any fuel would work just as well.
Some engines use a principle where extra fuel is injected at the end of the exhaust stroke and this is intended to increase the temperature of the gases leaving the engine. However, if the DPF is rather clogged, it can't use this excess fuel and that can cause cylinder wash and an increase in oil level in the sump.
This is detrimental to engine life, naturally enough, and the oil needs to be replaced before high stressed items such as the turbo calls it a day. When this happens, replacement of the DPF is the way to go.
John :)
 
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But how does the engine know and tell you the oil has been degraded and needs changing? If your car uses EOLYS fluid ,is this avoided?
As they used to say, if you don't ask questions, you never learn....
 

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Dave,
Not sure if this is the same as Oil Condition Sensor used in cars, but this one uses "magnets to attract and retain ferrous particles in the fluid, with identification of fine wear particles signalling fluid cleanliness or increased wear rates; and coarse failure pieces giving early indication of possible component failure. Additionally, the sensor will provide an alarm condition of water contamination in oil (but does not say how)"
https://www.gillsc.com/products/condition-sensors/4212-oil-condition-sensor/

But my gut feel is that in Cars, the car simply monitors Mileage and Engine Usage, and have an algorithm that estimates when to change oil.
sfk
 
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