Cooker Hood Help

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In that case the next step is to find a way in to the case but not knowing your mechanical abilities I don't know whether to advise:
1. Working out how to remove panels, or
2. Seeking help from someone else, or

3. Replacement.
I really can’t believe replacement of the entire hood is required because a bulb expired.
I think you should buy a new hood and not waste any more time on your current one.
That way you'll have a bright new sparkling unit with all of the original bulbs, filters etc. and a warranty.
However you'll of course add a 3A fused spur unit or socket/plug to reduce the chances of such damage occurring in the future.
Here's hoping no one tries to tell you it's not required.
 
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Personally, I would look at repairing it myself, but with a few more checks to make sure there is no further damage.

...and fit an FCU with an appropriately sized fuse!

It sort of reminds me of someone's argument for appropriately specified MCB's on cooker circuits! ;)

Yes, the cable was protected, good!
But if there was a 3A fuse, would the switch and the appliance also have been saved? :)

Edit... AHH, just beaten to it :)
 
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Personally, I would look at repairing it myself, but with a few more checks to make sure there is no further damage.

...and fit an FCU with an appropriately sized fuse!

It sort of reminds me of someone's argument for appropriately specified MCB's on cooker circuits! ;)

Yes, the cable was protected, good!
But if there was a 3A fuse, would the switch and the appliance also have been saved? :)
Let's get down to brass tacks:
PCB £52, harness £9/12/19, bulbs £10 , filter (probably not been replaced for years) £4 = ~£80 (+vat ? = £96) and at that point we still don't know if we have found the (whole) fault. Add an hour or two scraping out the grease and washing the filthy mess out.

I've been there far too often, spent far too many hours fault finding/repairing when a replacement takes minutes in comparison... oh and then found the other fault.
 
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Let's get down to brass tacks:
PCB £52, harness £9/12/19, bulbs £10 , filter (probably not been replaced for years) £4 = ~£80 (+vat ? = £96) and at that point we still don't know if we have found the (whole) fault. Add an hour or two scraping out the grease and washing the filthy mess out.

I've been there far too often, spent far too many hours fault finding/repairing when a replacement takes minutes in comparison... oh and then found the other fault.

Fair enough :)

Although this could also be a rewarding learning experience - soldering, PCB trace repair, switch replacement - some pretty basic (and cheap) stuff for someone who might want to get into electronics... and another appliance saved from WEEE waste :)
 
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Fair enough :)

Although this could also be a rewarding learning experience - soldering, PCB trace repair, switch replacement - some pretty basic (and cheap) stuff for someone who might want to get into electronics... and another appliance saved from WEEE waste :)
I couldn't agree more, if it were mine I'd certainly be expecting to repair... but even then I'm sure Mrs sunray would be considering recycling it as these thing do seem to age quicker than other kitchen appliances.
 
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Would this be a case of a 3amp fuse would have protected the appliance, or coincidence?
 
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My non expert opinion is that it is fecked. Replace it and be done with it :whistle:
 
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Would this be a case of a 3amp fuse would have protected the appliance, or coincidence?
I agree. It would seem that the supply is not fused and it should be, probably a 3A fuse would have prevented the PCB from frying. I have no doubt that is a requirement on the installation instructions.

The best thing would be for the OP to have a fuse holder added to the grid switch panel and wired in to protect the hood for the next time.
 
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I'm sorry if you feel that Winston has not added any value to this thread. I have found his input very entertaining, especially after his assertion a few days ago that is not wrong.
He quite clearly posted
Why do you think a simple extractor has a PCB?
only to be faced with that beautiful photograph.
pxl_20211201_201616478-jpg.252822


:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 
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There are those on the forum that believe that there is no need to fit a 3amp fuse at the isolation switch on a boiler, even though the instructions always ask for it.

I can't help thinking it is a good idea to fit 3amp fuses for boilers.
 
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For a typical boiler / heating installation, the 3A provides current limiting for all the components of the system.

I have seen the PCB of a central heating programmer fry - in a similar manner- because Mr Wet Pants left the (supplied) 13A fuse in the FCU instead of changing it to the required 3A value.
 
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For a typical boiler / heating installation, the 3A provides current limiting for all the components of the system.

I have seen the PCB of a central heating programmer fry - in a similar manner- because Mr Wet Pants left the (supplied) 13A fuse in the FCU instead of changing it to the required 3A value.
So what about all those central heating systems elsewhere in Europe run straight off a Schuko plug on a 16amp circuit?
 

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