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New cooker installation.

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by MariaH, 6 Dec 2020.

  1. MariaH

    MariaH

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    Hi, we are getting a new cooker. The old one has been removed from a circuit that states 32amp circuit in the consumer unit for the cooker. All the new cookers I am looking at seem to want higher? 40amp plus. Have I misunderstood is it OK to use the current circuit and just replace old cooker with the new one. Both are similar size. Electrical inspections have been carried out with current cooker installed this way. Advice please before I splash out on a cooker I can't install. Thanks
     
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  3. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    What is the rating of the cooker? Or what is the model number. Or link to what you are looking at.

    Every domestic cooking appliance you can buy will be alright on a 32A circuit, although I have known some needlessly ask for 45A.
     
  4. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Not necessarily.

    Most cooker circuits in the UK are wired in 6mm² - a legacy from BS3036 rewireable fuses.
     
  5. JohnD

    JohnD

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    What make and model is it?

    there are a few very large range models with numerous ovens, rings and hotplates rated at around 40A, but because of the way cookers work, it is very difficult (there is a way!) to make them use maximum power demand.
     
  6. MariaH

    MariaH

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    Info was coming from product website. Which is why I wasn't sure if that mention I needed the current time say that. I've also used an amp calculator I found and put the watts in on 240V and that came out well over the 32 amp. But all cookers I have looked at come out over so thought I was missing something in trying to calculate??
     
  7. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Most cookers do but as said even when all elements are switched on, which is not likely, they are not all consuming electricity all the time because of their thermostats.
     
  8. MariaH

    MariaH

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    So is it OK to put on the 32 as the old one was? We would be unlikely to have everything going at max power.
     
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  10. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Yes - assuming it is a domestic cooker.
     
  11. MariaH

    MariaH

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    Yes just a small double oven with ceramic hob. Not a large range or anything. Thanks for all the advice. I initially thought it would be a straight swapping over of the cable but then starting overthinking it. Just want to make sure it is safe.
     
  12. MariaH

    MariaH

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  13. JohnD

    JohnD

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    that figure has been calculated by someone who doesn't know how cooker ratings are calculated. There is a formula for calculating it. It is not done by simple addition.

    32A will be more than enough.

    For example my house contains about 48 double sockets. Notionally you could plug a 3kW fan heater into every socket. But the load in my house is not 288kW. It is, most of the time, around 350W to 500W, rising to about 5kW when we're cooking and for brief periods when both the dishwasher and washing machine are on their heating cycles and coincide, which rarely happens.
     
    Last edited: 6 Dec 2020
  14. flameport

    flameport

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    Fiction based on the total rating of all the elements, 9800W in that case which is about 43A. Only valid if all the elements were always on all of the time, which of course they are not.

    In reality, a standard 32A cooker circuit will be suitable.
    The picture of the back shows a label stating minimum 4mm² flex, which is only rated for around 32A anyway.
     
  15. Astra99

    Astra99

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    9.8KW equates to 43A @ 230V. (rounded up to integer) So...... Applying diversity ........10A + 30% of balance (33A) + 5A for socket
    this is 10 + 9.9 +5 = 25A (rounded up)

    So a 32A circuit is perfectly adequate! QED
     
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