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Painting satinwood over old gloss - losing my mind!

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by Flabbie, 28 Jun 2021.

  1. Flabbie

    Flabbie

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    Hi all!

    I am having an absolute headache trying to work out exactly how best to do this. I've spent hours researching and there seems to be so many conflicting comments out there.

    I wish to repaint all of the gloss in my house with a satinwood finish. There are several layers of paint on the woodwork already, and the most recent layer scratches away to reveal a very shiny yellow gloss.

    At the moment I am thinking of doing it this way;
    - clean glosswork with sugar soap
    - sand with 80 then 120 to remove sheen and smooth surface
    - use zinsser 123 as undercoat
    - paint with water based satinwood

    I'm stuck on a few things though and I'm not 100% if I've got the right idea.

    First, will 80 grit work to remove the top layer of paint and remove the sheen from the next yellow layer? Or should i use a different grade.

    Second, does anyone know of any reason why I shouldn't use the 123 zinsser? I was also looking at the BIN version, but both seem to suggest they can be used as a primer for glossy surfaces and I'd prefer something with no odour, which is why I'm leaning towards 123.

    And finally can anyone actually recommend a good water based satinwood? A lot of trade blogs seem to suggest dulux trade, but all of the actual reviews on it are awful.

    Any help here would be greatly appreciated because its driving me insane and I don't have a clue anymore!

    Oh also this is interior woodwork. I've opted for water based paint to avoid yellowing, and also because its low odour (I have pets). And finally because it apparently is more flexible and we have a lot of varying humidities which has caused some cracks in the current paintwork.
     
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  3. opps

    opps

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    If you can peel away the old paint with your finger nail, then, the previous person didn't prep the old paint work properly. I see that a lot, particularly when people apply waterbased finishes over old oil based finishes.

    The bad news is that you need to remove that coating. You can try to sand it back but you will probably find that the coating will instantly clog the paper. Meths or isopropyl alcohol will soften it enough to strap it off with plastic scrapers. Cellulose thinners will work so fast that you can use a green scouring pad (but, again, it will clog).

    You can apply BIN or 123 over the top, without any prep, but you will soon regret having done so. The finish will be prone to chipping. I use BIN, it is a great product but Zinsser definately oversell it's qualities. There is no substitute for preparing surfaces.

    With regards to waterbased finishes. As a pro, I tend to avoid them. I have used the Dulux Trade and Crown Trade waterbased eggshells. I wasn't impressed by either. I have used Eico a couple of times, it flows (very, very)nicely but has rubbish colour obliteration qualities. I am a member of a trade only decorator's forum. Some of the guys there use Benjamin Moore, Tikkurila, amongst other brands.

    If you find it difficult to get the waterbased paint to flow nicely, add a dash of Floetrol. It isn't cheap but 1L will probably be enough for all of the woodwork in a 2 bed house. If money is tight, buy a bottle of propylene glycol from fleabay for a fiver. it will help but won't be quite as good as the Floetrol. Don't be tempted to adds lots of water, it will compromise the durability of the paint.
     
  4. whatsthenews

    whatsthenews

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    In the process of skimming and redecorating our staircase.
    I want to use a waterbased eggshell on the wood at the side of the staircase (not sure what they're called)
    I was going to sand manually, but ended up using the paint scraper attachment on my multi -tool (careful or you'll take wood off!) and then sanding it right down with the sanding attachment. 120 grit then 200 I think.
    I'll just undercoat with a waterbased acrylic primer and undercoat. It was much easier than I thought.
     
  5. Itsalut

    Itsalut

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    Sounds exactly like mine!

    Rub down with the wet sanding sponge things (not sure of actual name clearly) until the sheen has gone. Fill in any holes/chips, dry and sand. Any areas where one layer of paint has come off revealing another layer of paint I would try and get as much of the top paint off as possible by scraping then sand to create a smooth edge. Wipe with damp cloth and paint on satinwood.

    We've been using Dulux satinwood and omg it was a nightmare at first until I understood it is all about speed and learning how to switch brush stroke directions flawlessly lol.
     
  6. whatsthenews

    whatsthenews

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    Top layers off off off and base layer sanded to a smooth finish.
    I hate Dulux paint. I recently painted a big external staircase for someone and used Bedec aqua advanced primer/ undercoat and then gloss.
    What a dream to paint with ,but I followed advance CE from elsewhere and made sure I kept my brush wet. Had a paint kettle with a small amount of water in beside me and dunk tip of brush every 3 or 4 dips into the paint.
    My advice get it on fast , don't try and go back over it ( except to quickly " dry brush" and brush marks off straight away) , and use the correct size brush.
    It's tempting to use a smaller brush when you're a DIYer and not as confident at getting up to the edges, but it just makes matters worse ,especially with water based paint. Will definitely use the Bedec again, but I don't think they do colours in it . Ours is a 60s house and I prefer not to highlight the skirtings and architraves etc, especially as we have oak doors.
     
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  7. Itsalut

    Itsalut

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    @whatsthenews yeah the key with satinwood is large brush and SLAP it on Bob Ross style. Never go over it and catch drips straight away and then leave, no touching. Threw the first 4 skirting boards I did in the skip and bought new pre-primed boards and by then I'd learnt my lesson haha.
     
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  8. whatsthenews

    whatsthenews

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    Didn't help that when I was painting the outside stairs it was really warm
     
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