Atmos - take heat from land rover and stores in home

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It might be - but you'll never catch me in a Toyota, let alone a Pious.

Hybrid technology is a bit of a joke as far as Green credentials go in my book. using petrol engine to burn fossil fuels to charge a heavy battery made of nasty chemicals in order to drive Tarquin and Johnny 500 yards to school is barmy.

Big, low revving diesels with massive Turbos/ Burning synthetically made Diesel with heat recovery... that's the way forward :LOL:.

Don't get me started of DPF technology :eek: :evil:


Besides I drive 5 hours a day normally. The missus drives a minimum of 20 miles when she ventures out. So for the likes of me this system is a good idea. Pretty useless for most city dwellers, but then a lot of this Eco stuff is due to the amount of space needed for things to work efficiently.
 
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They know all the answers don't they! :rolleyes:

Great, a Generac from Machine mart powering a washing machine motor.... Hardly new technology,

Lotus have made it work. You can buy a similar design now in the US. The Chevy Volt.

No Lotus haven't made it work and neither have chevy. Toyota haven't made it work properly nor Honda..... But they are selling them.

Drivel, do you know that if you feed the exhaust pipe into your open window, start the engine and breathe deeply, then you would make us all very very happy.... :mrgreen:
 
J

JonasX

They know all the answers don't they! :rolleyes:

Great, a Generac from Machine mart powering a washing machine motor.... Hardly new technology,

Lotus have made it work. You can buy a similar design now in the US. The Chevy Volt.

No Lotus haven't made it work and neither have chevy.

You don't know you are making it up. You a very good makerupperer. The Chevy Volt is on sale right now. Next year it will be the Vauxhall Ampera here.
 
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No man... VAG are almost as bad as Toyota... but I might consider a Transporter when the time comes to chop in my Tranny.

I just think the idea of blasting out the same sheeite down a motorway in a long hit is not better than dissipating the same said sheeite gradually over the cause of the entire journey.

Not to mention all the problems if you don't have long motorway journeys on a regular basis.

I have a lovely Honda Accord :D. Pre DPF model... Although Honda don't have any major issues with the iDTEC engine.

DPFs are just another tree hugger's silver bullet that ruins the efficiency of an engine. Along with EGR valves. :rolleyes:
 
J

JonasX

It might be - but you'll never catch me in a Toyota, let alone a Pious.

Toyotas are the most reliable cars you can buy. If you like breaking down then buy others. The Prius is fantastic to drive.

Hybrid technology is a bit of a joke as far as Green credentials go in my book.

Emissions are lower than the other filth and they return 65-70 mpg.

Filthy, noisy, diesels will be phased out. The way forward is all electric as batteries now can handle it. Hybrids are a stop-gap.

100% electric is now fully feasible. Lighter bodies, smaller lighter motors (we now have solid state motor-in-wheel-hubs), full reclaim of kinetic brake energy, computers to control all aspects...and smaller lighter batteries. All here now.

Yes, full electric" long-range" cars are feasible right now. All it needs is a lightweight dedicated body designed around the electric mechanicals and they are here.

However, improvement in supercapacitors can take them even further, either by using them to compliment chemical batteries, or if advances progress further, use them in place of batteries.

The future for city cars will be a toss between full electric with supercapacitors and an a car run on compressed air.

The great thing about compressed air tanks and supercapacitors, is that they do not wear out and will outlast the vehicle. All this is available NOW!!!!!

Supercapacitors is the way forward. The current supercapacitors store about 25% of the charge of a battery of the same physical size. That is in your car, the "battery" will be 4 times physically larger to have it replaced by a supercapacitor and it will never need replacing. That is available now and could be under the boot. If a car was designed to have the whole floor a supercapacitor bank, then it will have a hell of a range and a low centre of gravity. The car body will need to be designed around the capacitor of course.

Many companies are researching insulated bodies to keep the car cool or hot
to avoid taking current from the battery. Current cars are made from cheap
sheet steel.

The way forward is electric, so R&D is focused on that. Hybrids are a stepping stone to full electric, or a more efficient version of the Chevy Volt, out this year inn the US and to be made in Ellesmere Port, with an highly tuned engine that turns a generator and large battery pack.

What determines the future is battery and supercapacitor advances. Battery technology is actually here using Lith-Ion and Lith-poly. Initially supercapacitors and batteries will work in tandem then maybe only supercapacitors.

Current cars are made of rather cheap poor heavy materials. Pressed steel is the body. There is more pressure on cost, than weight with a substantial part of the cars weight made up of the heavy body. In carbon F1 cars the bodyshell weights almost nothing by comparison to its powertrain in percentage weight of the total vehicle.

Lighten a car body and add lithium batteries, regen braking and motor in wheel hubs, and you get to around 150-200 miles range. And that is ignoring advances in supercapacitors.

Initially electric car usage will be more urban/commuting than fast motorway cruising, as that is the vast percentage of driving, but every little helps and towns and cities will be cleaned up promoting better public health, cleaner buildings and far less noise pollution. Better aerodynamics can improve high speed economy, as can trading cornering performance by eliminating fat soft tyres, giving lower rolling resistance on taller wheels and harder tyres.

It is feasible to produce an electric car that is suitable for a second car at least right now, and the Nissan Leaf proves that. One that does the school run and takes you to work and the shops. It will not do a 400 mile trip if a 45 minute break and clipped into a charger. On-board fossil fuel chargers may be useful for "long range" vehicles, not coming in, in urban running.

With what we currently know, the single most important step is going from lead or nickel batteries at around 30-50 mile ranges, to lithium that will give 150 mile ranges or more.

Lithium batteries are at around the 700 MJ/ton mark now. The very best nickel metal hydride are less than half that. Nanogate capacitors are the same just below nickel metal hydride. A small car needs around a 50 Kwh, 180 MJ, energy in the "tank". In NiMh that's 3/4 ton, with Li-Ion it is more like a 1/4 ton.

A litre of diesel is about 10 Kwh, burned at around 20% efficiency. 50 litres of diesel is equivalent to 100 KWh of battery. So the equivalent of 25 litres of diesel in an electric power train at around the 400 kg mark is possible with Li-Ion batteries.

50 litres of diesel equivalent takes us up to equivalent of half a ton of battery. That is very comparable with the weight of a normal internal combustion engined powertrain. Electric cars require very little else besides the batteries, just small motors. No radiators, massive heavy, complex transmissions, exhaust systems, anti-vibration mounts and the miles of pipes and ducts that surround a current internal combustion engines vehicle setups. An electric car gives superior packaging of the batteries and mechanicals than the current internal combustion cars and can give superior handling, and safety, in a lower centre of gravity.

Then there is the spin offs to home and off-the-grid uses. The drive for electric cars, that is where the focus is, will cascade into homes.

Electric Mini that outperforms a Porche:
http://www.treehugger.com/files/2006/08/the_hybrid_mini.php

mini_hybrid.jpg


Any electric car can be produced affordable. Insulated bodies and advanced glass drastically reduce the need for heating and a/c. The Mini has water cooled motors to reuse some wasted heat.

The 100% EV Chevy Impact is now old hat to what is being developed.

The Chevy Volt is a great leap in production cars, not in technology available. It is still a heavy traditional body, much better insulated, light bodies can be produced than that. It runs entirely on electric motors.

As I stated, the secret will initially be in supercapacitors - a capacitor is a battery as it stores electrical energy, while a battery stores electricity in chemical form. Putting electricity into and drawing out of a supercapacitor is instant as there is no state change losses, while in a battery is is slow to charge and slow to extract, but currently high storage per physical volume of casing.
 
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Dan, you can only capture heat from a Land Rover if it starts in the morning....

They always start in the morning because they have an accessory called a starting handle which has been left off all other later designs.

I had a customer who worked on the software of racing gearboxes which do on power gear changes just based on meshing the gears at exactly the right moment.

Tony
 
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Ha! The 5.1 Transporter (The current model with the 2 litre engine) does not happy owners make.... Lots of electronic problems, twin turbo problems, particle regeneration system problems.... I have a much earlier 2.5 174 which has no cat and a blanked off EGR valve.... I intend to keep it as long as possible 'cos there are no good tough vans out there any more... I sometimes wish I'd kept my old T4..

Same with my car, I'll keep my Lexus IS200 as long as possible because I know that I'll never find another car as reliable and as much fun.... All this Hybrid guff serves no purpose other than to con the motoring public into thinking that they are being green
 
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My old T5 was a workhorse to - although the Turbo had died.

I must admit the choice of a Transport is a case of the lesser of the evils. I am worried. I like my tranny's drive, but it is made of mickey mouse material... I don't know what I will do frankly. It's 4 years old with 87K on the clock. Had the engine remapped though which is great fun :LOL:.

Was even looking at Hyundai at one point :eek: .

Renault/Vauxhall/Nissan clones are horrid. the Vito is the spawn if Satan (had all of them as courtesy vans). Toyota is - well Toyota. Honda sadly don't make a van - although I might consider importing something from Japan... Which leaves me rather at a blank... Still hopefully will have enough time to save the cash to buy outright.
 
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Think I'll stick with my envirofriendly 3.2 VW golf.
 
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Drivel, where does the elektrikery come from other than a dirty smelly powerstation?

Rocket power is the future, do you not watch the Jetsons?


Agile, I have a wonderful picture of a series 1 landy with tiptronic gearbox and launch control.... Is the starting handle electrically operated?.. :)
 
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Dan, I can feel the love between you and Toyota.... I won't ever buy another VW which as you say leaves us with either a Toyota or a Hyundai. I think that it would be Toyota for me but their cars are nearly all hybrids and the diesels that they use in their cars are pretty poor....

Lee I love Golfs but a 3.2 wouldn't love me... I'd be dead in a week.... Say, if you lend me your car I could take Drivel for a ride. :evil:
 
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If Toyota's are the most reliable cars you can buy why is it they've had to recall around 9 million vehicles worldwide to repair various defects?

Thy elektrikery. Majority produced by either burning fossil fuels, nuclear or burning something else, usually carp no-one else wants. Renewables are not constant.

Local company have just been served a suspension notice by the Environment Agency. They were operating a 'bio drying' facility, shredding waste otherwise destined for landfill, drying it and baling for ultimate use in a facility to generate electricity.

Trouble is, they haven't got the facility to burn the stuff up and running. So stockpiled it. (After being caught illegally burying it in the field next door....) Place then caught fire on 25th September. Massive firefighting operation ensued to put it out. Site handed back to the operator by Fire Service on 7th October. 10th October it went up again. Big time, and is still burning and expected to for another week. The smoke plume has been huge, and goodness knows what environmental damage has been done..... Nothing clean about that.
 

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