Energy Saving in an Open Plan world

Joined
15 Jun 2021
Messages
3,507
Reaction score
965
Location
Wales
Country
United Kingdom
Could you perhaps have some insulated panels made up, to fit into some of those windows, for use during winter? Likewise any roof lights. It will not help in summer though unless you were to leave the roof light panels in place.

The panels could even be combined with curtains/blinds - they could disguise the fact that the windows are blocked off.
Putting panels over half of the windows would likely make a noticeable difference, without cutting out too much light.

...and @twixx , I love what you have done to the garden! (y)
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
26 Mar 2011
Messages
150
Reaction score
6
Location
Aberdeen
Country
United Kingdom
The panels could even be combined with curtains/blinds - they could disguise the fact that the windows are blocked off.
Putting panels over half of the windows would likely make a noticeable difference, without cutting out too much light.

...and @twixx , I love what you have done to the garden! (y)

The "benefits" of marrying a gardener.

My 4 year old doesn't approve. No where to kick a ball about :D
 
Joined
16 Nov 2018
Messages
108
Reaction score
4
Country
United Kingdom
Ahh the joys of open plan living. It's very fashionable and on paper, a nice way to live (although personally, I don't want my kitchen to be part of my living room). But it's like trying to heat a barn. And all the heat heads upstairs as there's nothing to keep the heat where you want it.
 
Sponsored Links

MJN

Joined
30 Apr 2008
Messages
778
Reaction score
122
Location
Wiltshire
Country
United Kingdom
Open plan isn't all that different from 'closed'(?) plan living as long as heat losses are properly taken into account. The issue here has nothing to do with it being open plan - it's all that glazing.
 
Joined
30 Dec 2018
Messages
14,021
Reaction score
2,118
Country
United Kingdom
Open plan isn't all that different from 'closed'(?) plan living as long as heat losses are properly taken into account. The issue here has nothing to do with it being open plan - it's all that glazing.

We agree on that point, we don't have open plan, doors everywhere, but the internal doors generally remain open year round. The only doors I insist we have closed are the outside doors and the door which separate the kitchen from the utility and pantry at the rear of the house, simply because two of those walls are just double brick/uninsulated, though they do have some heat. The entire place is comfortable and for its size, economical to heat because it is so well insulated.

That sort of confirms how important heat loss and poor insulation can be.
 
Last edited:
Joined
26 Jun 2010
Messages
11,694
Reaction score
4,909
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
Does the underfloor heating get the room warm? If you get a camera don't just point it at the loss areas look at the floor and check the spacing of the underfloor heating tubes if it doesn't. If it does then your heating is OK you just cant afford it so insulation is all you can improve to reduce the cost. I have a not too dissimilar situation but it is a non-essential room; we just use the room for family occasions in the coldest weather and bite the cost bullet. Rest of the year it's a pleasure.
 
Joined
26 Mar 2011
Messages
150
Reaction score
6
Location
Aberdeen
Country
United Kingdom
The underfloor heating is electric, and we have 4 'modules' spread across the entire downstairs for total coverage. The UFH and/or Rads do a sufficient job of warming the area(s). I'd just use the Rads over the UFH due to cost.

The problem in this particular area I've pictured/shown/am discussing, is that the heat departs way more quickly than I'd like...

Covering the glass is where my head was at, but where and how is what I'd been struggling with. I hadn't really questioned insulation, but it makes sense, though there's very little I can do about what's in the roof/under the laminate, at least not without any major disruption.
 

MJN

Joined
30 Apr 2008
Messages
778
Reaction score
122
Location
Wiltshire
Country
United Kingdom
The law of diminishing returns would limit the benefit from changes to the floor and walls. Your issue is the glazing and its five-fold heat loss compared to everything else.
 
Joined
15 Sep 2017
Messages
30,970
Reaction score
2,500
Location
S. Uplands
Country
United Kingdom
The underfloor heating is electric, and we have 4 'modules' spread across the entire downstairs for total coverage. The UFH and/or Rads do a sufficient job of warming the area(s). I'd just use the Rads over the UFH due to cost

that Id say, is the clue to your problem.

I’ve built orangeries with glazed roof lantern and glazed side frames on 3 sides and the room has been toasty warm.

the secret is a minimum of 100mm floor insulation, perimeter insulation, wet underfloor heating, 75mm of screed, liquid anhydrite or hydraulic binder screed instead of conventional cement.

Wet underfloor heating takes a low load from the central heating system, so it’s very efficient. Inscreed wet systems use the whole screed as a heat sink.

I suspect electric was chosen as it has a lower installation cost - it could be a Mat system rather than in screed. You need 200watts per square metre for an effective primary heat source.

My guess is that would solve your problem, but I’m sure you don’t want to spend the £8k it could cost
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top