Covering unused smoke detector hole

Joined
27 Feb 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Hi all, this is my first post on this forum, but I suspect not the last one...

I'm replacing one of my ceiling mains-powered smoke detectors with a battery-powered one that is also much smaller. The diameter of the old one was 12cm and the diameter of the new one is 6cm.

After taking off the old one, there is obviously a 12cm spot with about 6cm hole that needs covering. I am trying to think of a simple way to cover the 12cm spot and attach the new smoke detector to that cover (trying to avoid plastering, etc.). In my head I see some sort of plastic cover plate either glued or drilled (but in a way that the screws are not seen) to the ceiling and the smoke detector glued / screwed to that plate (the detector weights 70 grams).

What would people recommend I do? Is there something off the shelf I could buy to achieve what I am trying to achieve...?

See the attached photo.

TIA!

20210227_195248625_iOS.jpg
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
30 Sep 2011
Messages
8,821
Reaction score
2,016
Location
Lancashire
Country
United Kingdom
I really doubt that ther would be any sort of off the shelf repair other than a circular conduit box cover of the appropriate size. That leaves two dome head screws in your ceiling

Easiest other than that? Piece of 3mm MDF or hardboard sawn to a circular shape, edge sanded (to round off), stuck onto ceiling with grip adhesive, any gaps filled with deco caulk, painted in to match ceiling. Done properly this is fairly unobtrusive, but can still be seen

Best, or nearly so? Cut out a small section of ceiling in a rectangle using a pad saw and remove all the wiring, etc. Cut a piece of plasterboard 50mm wider and 50mm longer than the hole you have made. Score the paper at the back of the plasterboard 25mm in from the edgeds on all 4 sides. Snap these strips off and carefully peel back to leave a 25mm overhang of paper on all 4 sides. Clean off any residual bits of gypsum. This should be a snug dry fit in the hole in the ceiling. Coat these paper edges with PVA, copiously. Coat the exposed edges of gypsum with a water-based grip adhesive (e.g.Gripful yellow) or with drywall jointing compound. Insert the plasterboard into the hole in the ceiling and roller the paper overhangs flat onto the ceiling. If your fit was snug this will hold whilst the glues set, if not you will need to support itvwothban offcut of plywood and a piece of 2 x 1 lath cut 40 to 50mm longer than the distance between the floor and ceiling and bent to spring it in place (this is a "go bar"). When dry smooth off fill any gaps with drywall jointing compound. Sand when completely set. Done right, very difficult to spot once painted in. Old shop fitting trick because it is so fast
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
27 Feb 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Hi guys, thanks a lot for your great suggestions! In the end I decided to keep the 'dumb' mains-powered detectors and rather than replacing them with smart battery-powered detectors (connected to my smart home hub and in case of any issues sending us notification, flashing lights, etc.), enhancing the whole system with the smart detectors instead. Thanks again!
 
Joined
3 Sep 2006
Messages
36,459
Reaction score
5,140
Location
West Mids
Country
United Kingdom
You must surely only be changing a mains detector for a battery one for aesthetics, so I can't see why you'd want an awful plastic cover plate (to melt and fall off with with alarm.

The plasterboard ceiling is part of the fire protection and holes in it should be suitably filled.

Fill it and smooth it and make a proper job of it, not a bodge.
 
Joined
27 Feb 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
You must surely only be changing a mains detector for a battery one for aesthetics
Incorrect actually. I'm fitting in a number of smart smoke detectors that talk to the rest of my smart home and can notify me of any potential problem even when I am away from home.
 
Joined
3 Sep 2006
Messages
36,459
Reaction score
5,140
Location
West Mids
Country
United Kingdom
can notify me of any potential problem even when I am away from home.

"Beep, beep your house is/might be burning down"?
Is that really of any use when you're miles away?

I have mine just to turn on the lights to the room and escape route. That's the only real benefit, IMO.
I did toy with the idea of the temperature function starting up a fan when the landing gets hot in the summer.
 
Joined
27 Feb 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Is that really of any use when you're miles away?

Yes, it is. I might at least be able to text my neighbours to watch out or get into my house to have a look.

Better to have an opportunity to do something about a potential fire even if remotely than simply come back to a burned down house...
 
Joined
14 Mar 2006
Messages
18,960
Reaction score
2,250
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
"Beep, beep your house is/might be burning down"?
Is that really of any use when you're miles away?

I have mine just to turn on the lights to the room and escape route. That's the only real benefit, IMO.
I did toy with the idea of the temperature function starting up a fan when the landing gets hot in the summer.
And if source of fire is by the router or an electrical fire takes out the supply it’s not much use.
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top