1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Possible to "repair" door hinge?

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by hellopaul2, 17 Dec 2017.

  1. hellopaul2

    hellopaul2

    Joined:
    30 Aug 2012
    Messages:
    74
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hello,
    I have an internal timber door that has dropped by a few mm, presumably due to the hinges getting worn over the years.

    Here are a couple of photos; the first one shows the hinge in its usual, dropped position...
    ...and this one shows it with me lifting the door into the position where it should be:

    So, I could buy a pair of 100mm hinges (the existing hinges are 3 7/8", so about 98mm) and try to find something that looks old and has matching screwholes, but I was wondering if anyone knows of a way to fix an old hinge? Googling anything about fixing door hinges just brings up pages of results about fixing doors whose hinges have pulled away from the frame, etc. but nothing about fixing the actual hinge. What I really need is some kind of C-shaped washer; is it normal to push something like this into the hinge, and have it actually work and not drop out? The hinges don't seem to come apart - there's no visible pin which can be tapped out - I'm not sure what magical method they used to make these things.

    So - in a nutshell - any ideas on how to fix a hinge?

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

    Paul
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. DaveHerns

    DaveHerns

    Joined:
    11 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    2,583
    Thanks Received:
    207
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Would turning the hinge the other way up work? Should then take the load on unworn surfaces, I think.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    • Like Like x 1
  4. hellopaul2

    hellopaul2

    Joined:
    30 Aug 2012
    Messages:
    74
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    @DaveHerns You just might be a genius. I am going to try that right now!
     
  5. Burnerman

    Burnerman

    Joined:
    7 Feb 2008
    Messages:
    21,080
    Thanks Received:
    4,079
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You may get a little more life from the hinge if you turn it upside down, but really it's had it's day and time for a new one. Blocking off the original screw holes isn't a problem and is normally done by hammering in some dowel coated in PVA glue.
    John :)
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Burnerman

    Burnerman

    Joined:
    7 Feb 2008
    Messages:
    21,080
    Thanks Received:
    4,079
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Great minds, eh Dave!
    John :)
     
  7. hellopaul2

    hellopaul2

    Joined:
    30 Aug 2012
    Messages:
    74
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Well, my excitement was short-lived. I took off the door, removed the top hinge, refitted it the other way up, then tried to remove the lower hinge, only for one of the screw heads to break :(. So I left the lower hinge as-is, refitted the door...and it's now LOWER than before! I wonder if someone had already tried the inverting-hinges trick. Ah well, I'll buy a couple of new hinges tomorrow and also some kind of magical-broken-screw-removing-wand. I have no idea if I'll be able to drill it out...anyone got any good ideas on how to remove a fairly large, broken-headed screw from a door? Maybe I'll need something like this, complete with its one-star review :unsure:.
     
  8. Burnerman

    Burnerman

    Joined:
    7 Feb 2008
    Messages:
    21,080
    Thanks Received:
    4,079
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Drilling the screw out would be nigh on impossible, but it could be possible to drill a hole alongside the screw and then prise it to one side and lever it out.
    No worries though, you don't need a screw in every hole to support the door.
    John :)
     
  9. big-all

    big-all

    Joined:
    12 Jul 2004
    Messages:
    18,007
    Thanks Received:
    1,367
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    before you drill anything out get the new hinges as it may be a case off a new hole in a new place with the need to cut file off knock off the remaining part off the screw head assuming half a slotted screw
    and possibly a nail used as a punch if its a mm or two proud
     
  10. Sponsored Links
  11. hellopaul2

    hellopaul2

    Joined:
    30 Aug 2012
    Messages:
    74
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Well, I got some new hinges, with holes in different places from the old hinges (seemed impossible to find hinges that matched exactly). I bunged up the existing, non-matching holes in the frames with dowels and glue, and fitted the new hinges, plus some stiff sheets of cardboard to pack the hinges out (even though they are quite thick by modern standards, they're considerably thinner than the old hinges). The door chafed and caught even worse than before I changed the hinges (in TWO places now - the floor AND the frame where it's sitting too far back into the frame), which, as you can imagine, filled me with joy that I'd put seemingly billions of hours of work into this and only made the problem worse. So I changed the thicknesses of the cardboard, and managed to get it to not catch. But it's still way too far over for the latch to actually hold the f***ing thing closed, and it "boings" open because the hinges don't close fully - probably because I re-used the old screws in the lower hinge and the countersunk heads sit very slightly proud.

    So, if anyone has any dynamite spare, I'd like to just blow the f^cker off the wall and set fire to it. Or find someone who can make an EXACT replica of the hinges I took off (without the wear!).

    But it's time to move on to the many, many other projects I have going on. Such as fitting my kitchen worktops that only arrived yesterday...which were supposed to arrive last week:mad: so they'd all be fitted and done in time for Christmas....o_O
     
  12. Nige F

    Nige F

    Joined:
    28 Jun 2005
    Messages:
    20,419
    Thanks Received:
    1,570
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Are the old ones Cast Iron hinges ? they are thick and different closing to pressed steel ones;)
     
  13. hellopaul2

    hellopaul2

    Joined:
    30 Aug 2012
    Messages:
    74
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes, the old ones are (probably) cast iron. The ones I bought aren't those thin pressed steel ones, they're these: https://www.toolstation.com/shop/p65847?table=no
     
  14. Duh, no. Think about it.

    Hinges are standard, just get a new pair, and they'll drop straight in place. Those are steel hinges, and have rusted slightly, and whilst they're dirt cheap; better to get a pair of fire rated hinges with roller bearings, and you'll never have any more problems. If they are thinner than the old ones, then pack the back out with a bit of card.
     
  15. DaveHerns

    DaveHerns

    Joined:
    11 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    2,583
    Thanks Received:
    207
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Burnerman and me can't both be wrong!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    15,666
    Thanks Received:
    1,721
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You don’t need any special hinges just ability to hang a door correctly .
    Get someone in to door it properly .
     
  17. RigidRaider

    RigidRaider

    Joined:
    9 Aug 2006
    Messages:
    1,727
    Thanks Received:
    68
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I've played this game when fitting new doors in my house and it can be a nightmare trying to reuse the same rebates. You're better off filling the old hinge rebates with a strip of wood, glued and pinned, then starting again with brand new hinges and new rebates. Fit three hinges to each door as well.

    Unwanted strips of wooden blinds make good fillers. Once the glue has dried you can chisel them flat then fill around them, sand, prime and paint.
     
Sponsored Links
Loading...

Share This Page