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Tesco

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by PullerGas, 13 Oct 2016.

  1. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    Anyone shopping there anymore? Between the £ shop, Aldi & Lidl we haven't been in there for ages.

    See they're putting the screw on Unilever. For too long these Supermarkets have been screwing everyone, customers & suppliers!!
     
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  3. big-all

    big-all

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    its all a big game
    a bit off posturing
    they want 7% more the supermarket want say 3% increase so start at 0 and 10% then compromise between 4 and 6%
     
  4. securespark

    securespark

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    Supermarkets have been screwing suppliers for years!

    Esp. farmers.

    At 79/89/99p per half gallon, how much do you think the farmers are getting?

    Then there's veg, thousands of tons of which are rejected because they don't "meet customers' expectations".

    Company expectations more like. How many customers truly care they are buying wonky veg?

    Then there's BOGOF deals on branded goods. Supermarkets don't pay for them, the manufacturers do.
     
  5. Tesco is still the largest supermarket chain in the UK.. I should imagine they'll come to an agreement soon as not selling the many products Unilever supply hurts the profits both companies a lot. Are there reports of panic buying ice cream yet?!
     
  6. Strangely I think people do care, got used to seeing something a certain way and now reject anything that's less than perfect. Plus it's expensive. I think I was one of those people myself, paying lots of money so I wanted my food to be the best available. If wonky veg was sold off cheaper, I'd have bought that.

    I grow my own veg now and I don't care what it looks like, just chuffed managed to grow anything at all :)
     
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  7. securespark

    securespark

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    Let's face it, if it's chopped up on your plate, or blitzed into soup, does it really matter?
     
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  8. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    People now have started buying straight from manufacturers to cut out the greedy middle man. For example I can buy frozen organic meat or fruit online now in bulk quantities and save £ on what I would pay in the shops. You are still often dealing with a supplier but due to the fact they are online based they can operate with few overheads as basically all they are doing is ordering meet on your behalf. In some cases now farmers have started their own distribution channels, so you buy and get delivery straight from the producer.

    Only trouble is when you buy frozen what you can get in the post can be a catastrophic failure. Buying meat online at the moment is a hazard because the technology does not exist to get the product to the front door without a big drop in storage temperature, and people do get ill especially if they buy meat from less reputable sources where there are higher quantities of pathogens already in the meat.

    Deliveries are only going to get better and more sophisticated though. Nuts and seeds is another one, I buy mine on amazon, compare the cost and you see how much the shops are making on it. Wouldn't dream of buying nuts or seeds in little gram bags from the shop now, absolute rip off.

    Another thing is people forget how to adequately store the food they buy. There's so much waste in this country. All you need is a few canning jars/mason jars and if you buy to much veg you can chop it up and store it in fermenting jars, actually improves the nutritional value of the food as well due to the way the bacteria act on it(our ancestors lived off of femented/pickled foods) and it stores for months and even years. People become accustomed to conveniance and they become lazy and stupid and have to rely on large corporations for the quick fix.

    Take allotments for example, you can quite easily grow enough food to last a small family most of the year if you are clever about what you grow and where. I grow fuke loads of garlic, potatoes, carrots, squash, beetroot, what I don't eat I freeze or can.
     
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  9. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    I'm not convinced they do, I don't and I don't know anyone that does. So long as you pay for the right quantities why would you care? There are obvious advantages to sizes and shapes for certain veg but not all.. potatoes for example.. loads of tiny ones are more difficult to peel than loads of big ones.. if you grow your own you don't give a fukc as you mention, I grow mine as well and sometimes you get funky shapes, adds to the charm.

    I think what this really is about is the disconnection people have from nature. It's like those people who can't stand the sight of a leaf on their lawn, I think you have to be slightly removed from the natural world to want things so orderly. It's not healthy and I don't think it's a syntax of thought for most people.
     
    Last edited: 13 Oct 2016
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  11. Or in the case of my allotment, annoy neighbours with bags of surplus runner beans etc :) I really enjoy having an allotment, takes up most of my spare time but when you sit down to a dinner that you've grown yourself it's a good feeling, as well as costing a fraction in price and being tastier. Great to enjoy pickled beets, onions, spuds, garlic etc over the winter months as they keep so well, all for pennies.
     
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  12. As well as wanting 'perfect' veg and fruit for my money for years, I've seen others do it, friends, partner, my mum. My dad in law in his late 80's won't let someone go shopping for him as he's very fussy and likes to choose his own and he takes ages picking out what he thinks is the best. For me, when I used to pay £2 for about 20 raspberries or strawberries in a punnet (pre-allotment), 45p for an apple, £1-2 for just 6 tasteless toms, I wanted perfect. Some fruit and veg are very expensive so I wanted what I thought was my moneys worth.
    I would've been more than happy to pay less for less than perfect tho, but there was never that option.
     
  13. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    True but initially I don't think it is cheap because of the investment in tools and quality seed. The allotment site I'm on is a horrible place, they treat newcommers with contempt and pile on pressure to see if they stick with it - like an endurance test. I suppose it's because they don't want to have to carry people, as I'm sure there are people that would just go up there for a few glasses of pimms while someone else mows their grass and digs their plot if they could get away. I found money saving comes a few years in when you know exactly what you want in terms of output, the first few years at least is spent failing to grow stuff and having unrealistic expectations.
     
  14. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    I can understand from a nutritional perspective it makes sense but not just apperance. You are buying something you're about to cut up into pieces..

    Maybe he wants to make sure fruit like pears/peaches etc are suitably ripe.. or he wants to check out the local arse and is using the fruit and veg as an excuse
     
  15. I didn't have that trouble because had all the tools anyway, pinched off my better half and stuff had from gardening in the old house. There's also ways to cut costs, I always buy my seeds at the end of the season at a fraction of the price - Wilco's for example sell off branded seeds for 50p instead of £2-3, same as netting, plant food etc. And things like fruit bushes, Tesco sell them in March for £2 - one punnets worth of raspberries for example and got the money worth back. As you can tell, I quite enjoy trying to do my allotment on the cheap, part the fun.

    Sorry your allotment folk are a pain... nearly all of mine are ace luckily. We do have a lazy council tho who don't insist unused plots are given up, am surrounded by overgrown allotments and have been like it since I started 3 years ago. £20 a year for a half plot is too cheap for them to pay and keep just in case they change their minds I suppose.

    Lol, probably! :)
     
  16. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    Declining profits, dodgy accountancy practices & shrinking market share.

    I'd pay more for a Pint of Milk to help the Farmers.

    Tesco's fruit & veg has always been rotten!!!
     
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  17. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    Oi, stop hijacking my shyte Supermarket thread with your half arzed attempt at growing veg!!
    Most allotment owners just use chemicals to bring on their veg, more E numbers in a carrot than a Packet of Haribos!!
     
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